Wednesday, 30 April 2008

films for kids, about kids, and even by kids

Tickets are now on sale for Little Big Shots, Melbourne and Australia's major international film festival for kids!

Little Big Shots showcases the best in filmmaking for and by kids and teenagers under 18 from Australia and around the world.

Returning to its hometown for its fourth year in June, Little Big Shots is screening a fresh crop of 87 films from 25 countries before taking off on its Australia­-wide tour.

The films screening in this fun-filled festival inspire discussion of world cultures, language, cultural diversity, emotional intelligence and human values. They're also perfect for making kids laugh, whoop, think and create. From Sweden to South Africa, Poland to Palestine, and China to the Czech Republic, kids can experience the world from their cinema seats.  

The international film highlights in 2008 include:

Snakebite (Scotland) ­
When something bites Sammy at the river, his pal David is convinced it's a snake. Believing the tale wholeheartedly, Sammy wanders off to contemplate his fate and, more importantly, to tell his mum. Winner Best Short Film at the 2007 Chicago International Children's Film Festival, and best film and best comedy at Australia's 2007 Heart of Gold film festival. This film screens in package #4 and is best suited to ages 8 to 18.

Glosoli (Iceland)
­Glosoli is a multi award­ winning music video by famed Icelandic band Sigur Ros, described by one reviewer as 'a life­changing experience'. With a hint of the Pied Piper, a drummer boy marches across the fields of Iceland gathering child followers as he goes, leading to the biggest, most breathtaking moment of their lives. This film screens in package #4 and is best suited to ages 8 to 18.

Imagination (Japan) ­
A super-­short clip (just 1.5 mins!) produced by the Japanese Ad Council. With a beautifully filmed message, only partly revealed by its title, this film won a Silver Lion for advertising at Cannes in 2002. This film screens in package #3 and is best suited to ages 5 to 18.

The Wrong Trainers (UK) ­
A short animation drawing on five different animation styles, and depicting the first­-person stories of impoverished kids across the UK. Directed by the BBC's Kez Margrie, The Wrong Trainers was awarded the best child's film at the BAFTA, plus by the British Royal Television Society, the Chicago International Children's Film Festival and Best Documentary at the Berlin International Short Film Festival. This film screens in package #2 and is best suited to ages 7 to 18.

Aston's Stones (Sweden) ­
When Aston the pup finds his first ­ever stone, he decides to take it home to look after it, like his own pet. This beautiful animation was awarded best short animated film at the 2008 Seattle's Children's Film Festival. This film screens in package #1 and package #8 and is best suited to ages 2 to 10.

Western Spaghetti* (Canada)
The soundtrack to a cowboy movie inspired this multi award ­winning 13-­year­-old filmmaker with an Italian heritage to find his own song. Winner best Film, Sprockets Toronto International Children's Film Festival, and Kids Eye Award, 2007 Rhode Island Film Festival. This film screens in package #2 and is best suited to ages 7 to 18.

Some of the Australian film highlights include:

The Goat That Ate Time (NSW) ­
Narrated by actor Aden Young, this Inside Film award­-winning animation also won Best Film by an Emerging Director at the 2007 Chicago International Children's Film Festival, and was nominated for an AFI Award for Best Short Animation. This film screens in package #2 and is best suited to ages 7 to 18.

Bread (NSW)
This AFTRS student film has screened at the WOW Film Festival and tells the story of a young Vietnamese­ Australian girl who misses out on playing in a crucial soccer game because she has to work in her family bakery. Best suited for ages 8 to 18, this film screens in package #4.

Snow...What? (Vic)
This humorous retelling of the familiar story of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves is the creation of 14 ­year-­old Marisa Lai and her sister Francesca. A mix of claymation and white­board drawings, this film is best suited for ages 11 to 18 and screens as part of package #6, as well as a special screening of films made by Aussie kids.

Voice of Children ­- Ngaweeyan Thookayngat (Vic) ­
Under the guidance of acclaimed director Richard Frankland, an inspiring group of Melbourne's Koorie kids share their culture and ideas with the audience and each other. This film won the hearts of audiences at NAIDOC week and features interviews with footy player Nathan Lovett­ Murray and campaigner Alf Bamblett. Best suited for ages 11 to 18, this film screens as part of package #6, as well as a special screening of films made by Aussie kids.

The 3G of Us (NSW)
When a young girl's parents decide to split up, together they find ways to still unite the family via videophone hook­ups. An animated short based on the drawings and writing of Uma, a vibrant and technically savvy six year old, this film is best suited for ages 6 to 12 and screens as part of package #5.

My Greatest Day Ever (NSW)
This hilarious short tells - with perfect comedic timing ­- the story of Scotty, who wakes for his footy grand final to be told his lucky sock is nowhere to be found. Having screened at all the top North American kids' film festivals, this film is best suited for ages 5 to 18 and screens as part of both package #3 and package #9.

Little Big Shots will also screen a pre­-schoolers' session at ArtPlay on Birrarung Marr at 10.30am on Friday June 6, and an animation workshop in conjunction with Nickelodeon at 11.15am and 3.45pm on Sunday June 8.

Further information

For images, film preview requests or to co­ordinate interviews with junior or adult filmmakers, contact festival director Marcella Bidinost on (03) 9697 9411 or marcella@littlebigshots.com.au
 
 
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