Silkworm

Japan, 1952

Film
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The life cycle of the silkworm, and silkworm care on a Japanese farm. Soon after emerging from her chrysalis the female silk moth lays over 500 eggs, which hatch in a few days. The young silkworms are fed chopped mulberry leaves and after four weeks are fully grown and are moved to straw racks where they spin their cocoons. Close-ups and microcinematography show the growth processes in detail.

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Collection

In ACMI's collection

Credits

production company

National Farm Cinema Association of Japan

director

Vikichi Ohta

Duration

00:18:00:00

Production places
Japan
Production dates
1952

Collection metadata

ACMI Identifier

009818

Language

English

Subject categories

Advertising, Film, Journalism, Mass Media & TV → Microcinematography

Agriculture, Business, Commerce & Industry → Farm life - Japan

Animals & Wildlife → Insects

Animals & Wildlife → Insects - Behavior

Animals & Wildlife → Moths

Animals & Wildlife → Silkworms

Climate, Environment, Natural Resources & Disasters → Natural history

Documentary

Documentary → Documentary films - Japan

Educational & Instructional

Educational & Instructional → Educational films

Short films

Short films → Short films - Japan

Sound/audio

Sound

Colour

Black and White

Holdings

16mm film; Access Print (Section 1)

Please note: this archive is an ongoing body of work. Sometimes the credit information (director, year etc) isn’t available so these fields may be left blank; we are progressively filling these in with further research.

Cite this work on Wikipedia

If you would like to cite this item, please use the following template: {{cite web |url=https://acmi.net.au/works/72825--silkworm/ |title=Silkworm |author=Australian Centre for the Moving Image |access-date=14 August 2022 |publisher=Australian Centre for the Moving Image}}