The Queen in Germany

Germany, 1965

Film
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The visit of Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh was a token of reconciliation between Britain and Germany. Shows the official welcome at Bonn, by the Federal President; journey by steamer up the Rhine; a performance of Die Rosenkavalier in Munich; inspection of the British garrison in Berlin; a farewell dinner on the Royal Yacht Britannia before departing from Hamburg. Narrated by George Vine.

Credits

co-director

Ulrich Weidmann

Manfred Purzer

production company

Cinecentrum

Language

English

Duration

00:23:20:00

Colour

Colour

ACMI Identifier

27681

Subject categories

Anthropology, Ethnology, Exploration & Travel → Berlin (Germany)

Anthropology, Ethnology, Exploration & Travel → Germany - Description and travel

Anthropology, Ethnology, Exploration & Travel → Munich (Germany)

Documentary

Documentary → Documentary films - Germany

Economics, Philosophy, Politics, Religion & Sociology → Visits of state

History → Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain, 1926-

History → Germany - History

History → Monarchy - Great Britain

History → Philip, Prince, consort of Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain, 1921-

History → Visits of state

People → Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain, 1926-

People → Philip, Prince, consort of Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain, 1921-

Places → Berlin (Germany)

Places → Munich (Germany)

Short films

Short films → Short films - Germany

Sound/audio

Sound

Holdings

16mm film; Access Print (Section 1)

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If you would like to cite this item, please use the following template: {{cite web |url=https://acmi.net.au/works/71984--the-queen-in-germany/ |title=The Queen in Germany |author=Australian Centre for the Moving Image |access-date=22 January 2021 |publisher=Australian Centre for the Moving Image}}