Where have all the farms gone?

Canada, 1969

Film
Please note

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Tumbledown, weatherbeaten old barns and dwellings stand like gaunt skeletons of other times, reproachful of an economy that let them down. Unable to compete with food-chain marketing, the farmers have moved into town, and eventually the bulldozer applies the final indignity to buildings that once represented a full and wholesome way of life. Filmed in 1969 in the Upper Ottawa Valley of Ontario and Quebec, this film carries nostalgia in its mute question: What price progress?

Credits

production company

ONF | NFB

producer

Tom Daly

Duration

00:16:07:00

Production places
Canada
Production dates
1969

Collection metadata

ACMI Identifier

011887

Language

English

Subject categories

Agriculture, Business, Commerce & Industry → Farm life - Canada

Agriculture, Business, Commerce & Industry → Farmers

Animals & Wildlife → Food chains

Anthropology, Ethnology, Exploration & Travel → Ottawa (Ont.)

Anthropology, Ethnology, Exploration & Travel → Quebec (Province)

Climate, Environment, Natural Resources & Disasters → Food chains

Documentary

Documentary → Documentary films - Canada

Economics, Philosophy, Politics, Religion & Sociology → Canada - Economic conditions

Mathematics, Science & Technology → Food chains

Places → Ottawa (Ont.)

Places → Quebec (Province)

Short films

Short films → Short films - Canada

Sound/audio

Sound

Colour

Colour

Holdings

16mm film; Access Print (Section 1)

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If you would like to cite this item, please use the following template: {{cite web |url=https://acmi.net.au/works/74681--where-have-all-the-farms-gone/ |title=Where have all the farms gone? |author=Australian Centre for the Moving Image |access-date=27 October 2021 |publisher=Australian Centre for the Moving Image}}