Birth reborn

United Kingdom, 1982

Film
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Episode of Series “Forty Minutes”.
Looks at the work in France of Dr Michael Odent who firmly opposes standard medical thinking on childbirth practices. He advocates that women should be able to give birth in the position in which they feel most comfortable rather than being forced into the “stranded beetle” (legs in stirrups) position commonly used in hospitals. Shows a series of births in which Dr Odent helps women to give birth naturally and with a minimum amount of pain. Also depicts the work of Dr Odent in his pre-birth classes where he encourages women to give birth in different positions: standing or squatting. Suitable for middle and upper secondary, and tertiary levels.

Credits

production company

British Broadcasting Corporation

Language

English

Duration

00:40:00:00

Colour

Colour

ACMI Identifier

32986

Subject categories

Documentary

Documentary → Documentary films - Great Britain

Family, Gender Identity, Relationships & Sexuality → Childbirth

Food, Health, Lifestyle, Medicine, Psychology & Safety → Alternative medicine

Food, Health, Lifestyle, Medicine, Psychology & Safety → Medical care

Food, Health, Lifestyle, Medicine, Psychology & Safety → Women - Health and hygiene

People → Odent, Dr. Michael

Short films

Short films → Short films - Great Britain

Sound/audio

Sound

Holdings

16mm film; Access Print (Section 1)

16mm film; Limited Access Print (Section 2)

VHS; Access Print (Section 1)

16mm film; Preservation Print (Section 5)

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If you would like to cite this item, please use the following template: {{cite web |url=https://acmi.net.au/works/77209--birth-reborn/ |title=Birth reborn |author=Australian Centre for the Moving Image |access-date=27 January 2021 |publisher=Australian Centre for the Moving Image}}