The World: A Television History. Ep. 03. The Birth of Civilisation

United Kingdom, 1983

TV show
Please note

Sorry, we don't have images or video for this item.

Episode number 3 of Series “The World: A Television History”.
The birth of civilisation (6,000 BC - 2,000 BC) was first recognised in Mesopotamia, Egypt, India and China. These four different civilisations were distinguishable from other cultures by several special features: the rise of cities and urban centres, craftsmanship, writing, a calendar, and mathematical skills. Dams and irrigation, also a feature, were set up to cultivate vast, dry lands. These were great achievements but with civilisation came the end of democracy, and although it was a decisive turning point in the advance of civilisation, it was at great human cost. Based on The Times atlas of world history.

Credits

production company

Network Television

Goldcrest

Bricomin Films

Channel Four

producer/director

Taylor Downing

Duration

00:26:00:00

Production places
United Kingdom
Production dates
1983

Appears in

The World: A Television History

Group of items

The World: A Television History

Explore

Collection metadata

ACMI Identifier

302186

Language

English

Audience classification

G

Subject categories

Advertising, Film, Journalism, Mass Media & TV → Television

History → History

History → History, Ancient

Television

Sound/audio

Sound

Colour

Colour

Holdings

VHS; Access Print (Section 1)

Please note: this archive is an ongoing body of work. Sometimes the credit information (director, year etc) isn’t available so these fields may be left blank; we are progressively filling these in with further research.

Cite this work on Wikipedia

If you would like to cite this item, please use the following template: {{cite web |url=https://acmi.net.au/works/81118--the-world-a-television-history-ep-03-the-birth-of-civilisation/ |title=The World: A Television History. Ep. 03. The Birth of Civilisation |author=Australian Centre for the Moving Image |access-date=20 October 2021 |publisher=Australian Centre for the Moving Image}}