Anzac: a nation's heritage

Australia, 1981

Film
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The ANZAC performance at Gallipoli is examined as are the towns that are there today and the graves that remain. Likens the ANZACS to the Greek heroes of ancient times. This is an edited version of a commemorative film made in 1965, 50 years after the landing of Australian and New Zealand troops at Gallipoli on April 25th, 1915. Highlights include memorial services in Australia, New Zealand and Britain, a re-enactment at Anzac Cove and scenes of Gallipoli and Troy today.

Credits

production company

Film Australia

Duration

00:19:00:00

Production places
Australia
Production dates
1981

Collection metadata

ACMI Identifier

302972

Language

English

Subject categories

Anthropology, Ethnology, Exploration & Travel → Turkey - Description and travel

Armed Forces, Military, War & Weapons → Australia. Army. Australian and New Zealand Army Corps

Armed Forces, Military, War & Weapons → Heroes

Armed Forces, Military, War & Weapons → Soldiers - Australia

Armed Forces, Military, War & Weapons → World War, 1914-1918 - Campaigns - Turkey - Gallipoli Peninsula

Documentary

Documentary → Documentary films - Australia

History → Heroes

History → History

Magic, Occult & Supernatural → Heroes

People → Heroes

Short films

Short films → Short films - Australia

Sound/audio

Sound

Colour

Colour

Holdings

16mm film; Limited Access Print (Section 2)

VHS; Access Print (Section 1)

16mm film; Access Print (Section 1)

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If you would like to cite this item, please use the following template: {{cite web |url=https://acmi.net.au/works/81847--anzac-a-nations-heritage/ |title=Anzac: a nation's heritage |author=Australian Centre for the Moving Image |access-date=22 September 2021 |publisher=Australian Centre for the Moving Image}}