Monuments to man

United Kingdom, 1991

Film
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People walk, ride and drive on it. They land their aircraft on it. Almost everything we need is built with it. This program is a study of the impact and influence of concrete on civilisation. The Romans discovered it by mixing volcanic ash, sand, water and crushed coral. They called it ‘concretus’, for a ‘coming together’. Concrete is so common that we tend to think it has always been around. But when visually examined, its history is dynamic, informative and, for the viewer, highly entertaining. The documentary covers the absorbing history of concrete from its discovery, its disappearance for 15 centuries and its re-emergence to become the most obliging and most effective of all building materials. It is an integral part of our life style - not only in practical terms but also aesthetic. Great designers such as Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright and the errant Spanish genius Antonio Gaudi, have used concrete as a sculptor would to form great masterpieces.

Credits

co-producer

Kate Faulkner

Peter Hille

production company

Nomad Films International

Ravensburger Film and TV

Duration

01:00:00:00

Production places
United Kingdom
Production dates
1991

Collection metadata

ACMI Identifier

38275

Language

English

Subject categories

Agriculture, Business, Commerce & Industry → Building materials

Agriculture, Business, Commerce & Industry → Concrete

Crafts & Visual Arts → Architecture

Sound/audio

Sound

Colour

Colour

Holdings

VHS; Access Print (Section 1)

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If you would like to cite this item, please use the following template: {{cite web |url=https://acmi.net.au/works/82383--monuments-to-man/ |title=Monuments to man |author=Australian Centre for the Moving Image |access-date=23 July 2021 |publisher=Australian Centre for the Moving Image}}