Menace

Australia, 1976

Film
Please note

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The early Cold War years in Australia were characterised by attempts to suppress political dissent including the banning of the Communist Party. Here we see the experience from the perspective of those who defended democratic freedoms. This is a critical look at the Australian political scene from the end of World War II to the commencement of hostilities in Korea. Emphasis is placed on the events surrounding the Communist party Dissolution Bill, the High Court judgement declaring the Act invalid and the 1951 referendum defeat in which Prime Minister Menzies unsuccessfully asked the Australian people to change the constitution and make the Communist Part Dissolution Bill law.

Credits

producer/director

John Hughes

Duration

01:11:00:00

Production places
Australia
Production dates
1976

Collection metadata

ACMI Identifier

38624

Language

English

Subject categories

Documentary

Documentary → Documentary films - Australia

Economics, Philosophy, Politics, Religion & Sociology → Australia - Politics and government

Economics, Philosophy, Politics, Religion & Sociology → Communism

Economics, Philosophy, Politics, Religion & Sociology → Communism - Australia

Economics, Philosophy, Politics, Religion & Sociology → Fascism

Feature films

Feature films → Feature films - Australia

History → Communism - Australia

History → Menzies, Robert, Sir, 1894-1978

People → Menzies, Robert, Sir, 1894-1978

Sound/audio

Sound

Colour

Colour

Holdings

16mm film; Access Print (Section 1)

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Cite this work on Wikipedia

If you would like to cite this item, please use the following template: {{cite web |url=https://acmi.net.au/works/82725--menace/ |title=Menace |author=Australian Centre for the Moving Image |access-date=25 July 2021 |publisher=Australian Centre for the Moving Image}}