Wise blood

United States, 1979

Film
Image via TMDb

Flannery O’Connor’s first novel was a mesmerising and almost hallucinigenic satire of deep-South Christian fundamentalism. This masterful film by John Huston, directed late in his career, is one of his finest works. Brad Dourif plays an alienated young ex-serviceman who wishes to create a new form of Church which preaches religion without salvation. On his perverse Pilgrim’s Progress through the underbelly of the Southern United States, he is taken up as a religious saviour by a range of unscrupulous con-men who are only to willing to exploit him for financial gain. Absurd and blackly comic, “Wise Blood” paints a disturbing picture of the twisted relationship between religion and politics in the United States. Released on the eve of Reagan’s election to President, this film questions the combination of religious hysteria, unashamed materialism and deliberate ignorance of fundamentalism.

Credits

production company

Ithaca Prod

co-producer

Michael Fitzgerald

Kathy Fitzgerald

director
Duration

01:42:00:00

Production places
United States
Production dates
1979

Collection metadata

ACMI Identifier

304341

Language

English

Audience classification

MA

Subject categories

Crime, Espionage, Justice, Police & Prisons → Swindlers and swindling

Feature films

Feature films → Feature films - United States

Literature → Folk literature, American

Literature → O'Connor, Flannery, 1925-1964

People → O'Connor, Flannery, 1925-1964

Sound/audio

Sound

Colour

Colour

Holdings

VHS; Access Print (Section 1)

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Cite this work on Wikipedia

If you would like to cite this item, please use the following template: {{cite web |url=https://acmi.net.au/works/83144--wise-blood/ |title=Wise blood |author=Australian Centre for the Moving Image |access-date=30 November 2021 |publisher=Australian Centre for the Moving Image}}