The Melbourne Games

Australia, 1983

TV show
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Episode of Series “Olympic glory: the golden years”.
Live through the unforgettable action for the first time the Olympic Flame blazed in the Southern Hemisphere. This program captures the momentous highs and lows Australians were able to savour first hand. It includes footage of the remarkable first, second and third places captured by Australian swimmers in the women’s 100m final, headed by the fabulous Dawn Fraser. The explosive confrontation between Hungarian and Russian water polo teams, less than three weeks after the Russian invasion. The pride of Betty Cuthbert’s glorious wins in the 100m, 200m and 4 x 100m relay races. Plus all the local magic of a youthful nation hosting the world’s premiere sporting competition. Narrated by Norman May.

Credits

director

Denis Phelan

producer

James Murray

production company

Video Sports

Golden Years

Language

English

Duration

01:00:00:00

ACMI Identifier

39246

Audience classification

G

Subject categories

Documentary

Documentary → Documentary films - Australia

Hobbies, Recreation & Sport → Cuthbert, Betty

Hobbies, Recreation & Sport → Fraser, Dawn, 1937-

Hobbies, Recreation & Sport → Olympic Games (16th : 1956 : Melbourne, Vic.)

Hobbies, Recreation & Sport → Olympics

People → Cuthbert, Betty

People → Fraser, Dawn, 1937-

Television

Television → Television series

Television → Television series → Television series - Australia

Sound/audio

Sound

Holdings

VHS; Access Print (Section 1)

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Cite this work

If you would like to cite this item, please use the following template: {{cite web |url=https://acmi.net.au/works/83324--the-melbourne-games/ |title=The Melbourne Games |author=Australian Centre for the Moving Image |access-date=24 January 2021 |publisher=Australian Centre for the Moving Image}}