Sitting on a Branch, Enjoying Myself (1989) Juraj Jakubisko
Sitting on a Branch, Enjoying Myself (1989) Juraj Jakubisko
Sitting on a Branch, Enjoying Myself (1989) Juraj Jakubisko

The Melbourne Cinémathèque & ACMI present

Sitting on a Branch, Enjoying Myself

Co-presented by the Czech and Slovak Film Festival of Australia

Juraj Jakubisko | Czechoslovakia, West Germany | | Unclassified (15+)
Film

Jakubisko’s dreamlike, tragicomic final film to be made under the failing communist regime (albeit a West German co-production) dared to explicitly tackle – and, moreover, burlesque – the Stalinist era. Aesthetically and thematically echoing Birds, Orphans and Fools from 20 years prior, and with glorious cinematography from Laco Kraus, it concerns another trio of outsiders who unite to establish an unorthodox household and keep at bay the world’s madness – here, in the chaotic immediate aftermath of World War II, in an abandoned Jewish bakery.

Format: DCP
Language: Slovak, Czech with English Subtitles
Source: Slovak Film Institute
Duration: 110 mins

When

Duration

110 mins

Rating

Unclassified (15+)

Where

Cinema 1, Level 2
ACMI, Fed Square

How to get there

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(3 consecutive weeks)
$27–$32

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$153–295

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Also screening on Wed 5 October

About the program

Gallows Bacchanalias, Fractious Fairy-Tales and the Rule of Three: The Cinema of Juraj Jakubisko (Wed 5 – Wed 15 Oct)

The irrepressible Juraj Jakubisko (1938–) represents the baroque vanguard of the Czechoslovak New Wave’s Slovak contingent. After assisting on early works by fellow students Jaromil Jireš and Věra Chytilová at Prague’s FAMU film school, Jakubisko soon made his own mark with a succession of acclaimed, flamboyant and provocative films which saw him dubbed “the Slovak Fellini” at the 1968 Venice Film Festival, but which also earnt him the sustained wrath of his nation’s censors, with three of his four 1960s features shelved until after 1989’s Velvet Revolution, including the extraordinary Birds, Orphans and Fools that opens this season.

Read the full program notes
Juraj Jakubisko with dog

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